What to expect dating someone with bipolar disorder

When Jim Mc Nulty, 58, of Burrillville, Rhode Island, got married in the 1970s, everything seemed fine at first.

"I think the more the person knows what their cycles are, the better they might be able to be in charge of them," says Myrna Weissman, Ph D.

Mc Nulty watched not only his own marriage fall apart, but the marriages of others with bipolar disorder as well.

"I've been running a support group for almost 19 years," he says.

That means spending money recklessly, becoming promiscuous, engaging in risky behaviors like drug and alcohol abuse, and even getting into trouble with the law.

"When you have a spouse with bipolar disorder who gets in a manic phase," he says, "it can be extremely detrimental to the relationship because they may be doing things that endanger you or may endanger you financially." On the other side of the curve is depression.

Leave a Reply