Macintosh software dating game

Chuck Woolery took over in 1997 after he left The Home and Family Show when the original format was reinstated and hosted for the last two seasons.Beginning in 1966, The Dating Game was often paired with The Newlywed Game.First Run December 20, 1965 – July 6, 1973(ABC Daytime)October 6, 1966 – January 17, 1970(ABC primetime)September 10, 1973 – September 1974(Syndication)Second Run September 4, 1978 – September 1980 (Syndication)Third Run September 15, 1986 – September 8, 1989(Syndication)Fourth Run September 9, 1996 –September 1999 (Syndication) The Dating Game is an ABC television show.It first aired on December 20, 1965 and was the first of many shows created and packaged by Chuck Barris from the 1960s through the 1980s.ABC dropped the show on July 6, 1973, but it continued in syndication for another year (1973–1974) as The New Dating Game.The program was revived three additional times in syndication afterwards.

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It's a weird little video, and very indicative of the type of PR stunts that were popular in the early days of the digital revolution. All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.In 1983, Apple was trying to get software developers excited about the new Mac platform and a new way of working with computers.The You Tube video below shows highlights of an Apple event in which Steve Jobs plays the part of The Dating Game host Jim Lange, asking questions about software development to three software magnates -- Fred Gibbons of Software Publishing Company, Mitch Kapor of Lotus Development, and some guy named Bill Gates from Microsoft.And to think, Jobs and Gates were as thick as thieves just a few weeks earlier. "Well, Steve, I think there's more than one way of looking at it.Following what Jobs likely categorized as a betrayal was a Jobs/Gates confrontation you may have heard before, with Gates defends Microsoft's actions. I think it's more like we both had this rich neighbor named Xerox and I broke into his house to steal the TV set and found out that you had already stolen it." All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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